Fun Hacking Stuff ahead

Recently I’ve found an old post-it with guidelines I wrote myself a couple of years back, two of those stood out: make mistakes don’t buy stupid stuff Seems like I haven’t been the most consistent person back then. The post-it got discovered during a clean-up session of my flat, the same session brought up the following stupidly-bought-and-never-used gadgets: one BBC micro:bit that should be able to capture Bluetooth Low Energy transmissions one Proxmark 3 RV4 that should be able to do some nifty RFID stuff (and that I was recently able to fix) one Realtek Software-Defined Radio USB Stick (rtl-sdr).

GnuPG/PGP and Evolution/Seahorse Private Key Woes

I have a quite simple setup: Fedora 23 on my Desktop, Ubuntu 16.04 on my Notebook and a YubiKey thrown into the mix. I do have my normal GnuPG key DD436203 that I’m using. There’s also an old and revoked key 3F5D00B6 with which I was testing my YubiKey with (note to myself: don’t use an YubiKey-crested private key as you cannot backup it). My main key offers an ElGamal 2048bit subkey – which does not work with the Yubikey (as that only supports 2048bit RSA).

How (NOT) to hide OpenVPN behind HTTPS/SSL

Update 2017: Sadly I found out (thanks due to the comments on this blog post) that using port-share does not encapsulates subsequent traffic in normal TLS. So using this method will not fool Deep-Package Inspection Firewalls. If you need to mask all your traffic, this is not an option – you might need to investigate stunnel, information can be found here, here or here. I assume, that the higher success rate of this method could be related to some firewalls checking the target of the initial https request.

Secret-sharing described by Prismacloud

One important part of the European Prismacloud project is dissemination: make ordinary people understand some of our cryptographic directives. Out of this, the following clip originated: The technique in question is called secret-sharing and was originally detailed in 1979.

Firejail: Chroot on Speed

Firejail describes itself as a SUID program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricing the running environment of running programs. We’ll just call it chroot or jail (for the BSDers out there).So, it’s SUID? First things first: it’s SUID, so if there’s an error within the firejail binary an attacker can gain root rights. This comes with the territory. How large is Firejail and how many dependencies does it have?

Low-hanging Security/Privacy for the Lazy 2016!

Keeping a good security and privacy is tough work. There’s always a trade-off between effort and achieved security. In this blog post I’ll mention small things that a ``normal” person should be able to perform — that still increase the overall security of that user’s data. Choose your Liege Bruce Schneier talks about the comeback of feudal security: you choose your liege lord and depend upon him for providing security.

OSCP: Check!

I have just received my OSCP exam success notification. This is a penetration-testing certification by Offensive Security with focus on hands-on-training.You get an eBook and a week’s worth of video lectures with guided exercises; access to a virtual lab with approximately 55 machines that you should gain full control over and will finish with an 24 hour exam in which you are supposed to root five target machines. All this should be documented and submitted at last 24 hours after your exam is over – my documentation had 264 pages.

Network Concurrency Problem

A project I’m involved with has a traditional distributed client-server architecture: multiple servers are interconnected, clients connect to one more servers. In this use-case we’re expecting around four to seven servers with long-running connections between them and approx. a dozen clients with short-lived connections to the server. Initially I had used plain Java networking but during 2013 I’ve switched over to netty.io as a communication layer. Benefits were more agile networking code, better concurrency, etc.

pathogen vs vundle

Pathogen was the first vim plugin management system that I’ve known of. The contender is Vundle which seems to be inspired in it’s configuration syntax (and name) by Ruby’s Bundler. So let’s compare those two. Pathogen Pathogen’s workings are quite easy to grasp: each plugin is a directory within “~/.vim/bundle/“; pathogen traverses through the plugin list and includes each one of them. Let’s see a sample directory: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [~/.

Capybara for automating Pen-Tests

After a successful penetration test a re-test is performed. The common approach is that the customer fixes the code and I perform the necessary steps to confirm that that initial security breach was closed. Sometimes it takes the customer a couple of tries to achieve that. Most security problems (XSS, CSRF, SQLi) can easily be automated tested, but I had problems automating server-side authentication and authorization problems. The test would have to emulate multiple parallel user sessions.